Sigmund Freud in his study with chow, 1937
© Sigmund Freud Copyrights

Historic home office

In our networked world, many professions find it makes little difference whether we're sitting in the office or in our living room. What's more, the separation of living space and workspace was implemented only with the start of industrialization. For many people, it was normal to work from home. Here we are mainly speaking about women, who were forced to work at home due to being prohibited from working elsewhere. However, there were also jobs that were just easier to do from home. What would the art world be like to day if Berta Zuckerkandl hadn't held her legendary salon at home? How would Arnold Schönberg's scores have sounded if he hadn't written them in his own study? What would have become of Sigmund Freud's psychoanalysis if he hadn't simultaneously lived and worked at Berggasse 19? And finally: How would Emperor Franz Joseph I have ruled if he hadn't sat at home in Schönbrunn or in the Imperial Palace? Four extraordinary Viennese personalities, four perspectives, four home offices.

Berta Zuckerkandl – The salonnière of Vienna Modernism

Klimt, Mahler, Wagner, Schnitzler, Freud, Werfel or Zweig. They all came and went at Berta Zuckerkandl's salon. Important encounters – and creations – happened within her four walls. For example, Vienna's Secession owes its creation to "the Zuckerkandl", who created a place of development and artistic freedom with her salon. Berta herself worked as a journalist, writer, as well as peace activist and went down in Viennese history as one of the most exciting hostesses.

Arnold Schönberg – The twelve-tone rebel

Inspired by Vienna Modernism, Arnold Schönberg also sensed that a radical, new sound existed within him. With his twelve-tone scale, he revolutionized the world of music. Because suddenly music was no longer harmonious but above all sounded true. He preferred to work at home. His sound sequences, which often took some getting used to, we still too much of a good thing for most Viennese at the time. His concerts were regularly scenes of turmoil.

Sigmund Freud – The archaeologist of humanity

One of probably the most famous home offices anywhere in Vienna, if not the world, was located inside Berggasse 19. Because Sigmund Freud's work rooms, like his theories, have gone down in history. His collection of archaeological objects is legendary. Over the course of his life, he collected over 2,000 souvenirs and dealt with their origins and myths. "My old and dirty friends", is what Freud supposedly liked to call his antiquities. They inspired him and allegedly helped him to firm up his ideas and save them from oblivion. Parts of his collection can still be seen today in the Sigmund Freud Museum.

Kaiser Franz Joseph I – Home office with a view

Work is simply better with a nice view. Of course, the Habsburgs had always known this. Franz Joseph's study in Schönbrunn offers a nice view as well as few insights into his everyday working life. For example, the emperor's home office differed sharply from the magnificent decor of his audience room. He preferred to decorate his work rooms with numerous private pictures and photographs of Empress Elisabeth. The self-styled "first secretary of state" started work at five o'clock in the morning and didn't even leave his desk for meals. A true workaholic.

Arnold Schönberg Center

Zaunergasse 1-3, 1030 Wien
  • Comments

    • Entrance to Zaunergasse 1

  • Vienna City Card

  • Opening times

    • Mo, 10:00 - 17:00
    • Tu, 10:00 - 17:00
    • We, 10:00 - 17:00
    • Th, 10:00 - 17:00
    • Fr, 10:00 - 17:00
  • Accessibility

    • Main entrance
      • no steps (Swinging doors )
    • Elevator available
      • 162 cm wide and 162 cm low , Door 90 cm wide
    • Further information
      • Wheelchair accessible restroom available.
    • Special offers for people with disabilities

      Tours for visitors with special needs on request.

    • Comments

      Access to all exhibition rooms: no steps.

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Sigmund Freud Museum

Berggasse 19, 1090 Wien
  • Vienna City Card

  • Prices

    • Free audio guides in German, English, French, Italian, Spanish and Russian.
  • Opening times

    • Mo, 10:00 - 18:00
    • Tu, 10:00 - 18:00
    • We, 10:00 - 18:00
    • Th, 10:00 - 18:00
    • Fr, 10:00 - 18:00
    • Sa, 10:00 - 18:00
    • Su, 10:00 - 18:00
    • The Sigmund Freud Museum is closed from March 1, 2019 to summer 2020 for remodeling work. During this time, the museum will move to two locations in the immediate vicinity. See website for information.
  • Accessibility

    • Main entrance
      • 35 Steps
    • Further information
      • Seeing eye dogs allowed
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Schönbrunn Palace (Schloss Schönbrunn)

Schönbrunner Schlossstraße, 1130 Wien
  • Vienna City Card

  • Opening times

    • daily, 08:00 - 17:00
  • Accessibility

    • Main entrance
      • no steps
    • Car parks Main entrance
      • Parking spaces for people with disabilities
        at main entrance portal (Schönbrunner Schlossstrasse, 3 parking spaces), Meidlinger Tor (2 parking spaces), close to Kavalierstrakt as well as Valerietrakt (2 parking spaces) and Fürstenstöckl (1 parking space)
    • Elevator available
      • 95 cm wide and 139 cm low , Door 90 cm wide
    • Further information
      • Seeing eye dogs allowed
      • Wheelchair accessible restroom available.
    • Special offers for people with disabilities

      Free wheelchair rental – contact attendant at main portal (3 wheelchairs) or at Hietzinger Tor and at Meidlinger Tor (1 wheelchair each).
      Supplemental devices available for the visually impaired. Tours for visitors with with disabilities or special needs on request.
      Museum Sign Language Guide available in ÖGS and IS for the Imperial or Grand Tour, prior reservation recommended, further information:
      https://www.schoenbrunn.at/en/visitor-information/barrier-free-access/

    • Comments

      Access to all exhibition rooms: no steps. Freight elevator for extra wide wheelchairs: door width: 160 cm, cabin depth: 220 cm, cabin width: 156 cm.

      Visitors' center in the Gardetrakt by the main gate, stepless access, door width: approx. 144 cm, wheelchair-accessible restroom can be reached by wheelchair platform lift – platform 110/140 cm, door width: 90 cm in the corridor area and 94 cm to the outdoors, accessible from outside with a Euro-Key.

       

       

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